How Hidden Figures haunts me

I took my oldest daughter to see Hidden Figures last weekend—a remarkable story that is very well told. It has something for everyone. Math geeks, feminists, space enthusiasts, romantics, justice advocates, history buffs—all will appreciate this movie. My daughter enjoyed it as much as I did.

One aspect of the story haunts me. (Besides the analytic geometry.)  I am nagged by the question, How could all those well-meaning white people not see the injustice they were perpetrating on those African American women? Continue reading “How Hidden Figures haunts me”

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If I could have a word with my Christian friends

The year 2016 has revealed many surprising things. Cleveland can win championships! The Cubs can play baseball!

The most significant revelations, of course, have been cultural and political. The racial and geographic divides are even deeper than we knew. There do indeed appear to be two Americas (at least).

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Not surprisingly, I’ve taken some flack for my last blog post. I imagine some of the offense comes from my use of the word repent. As incendiary as it is, I chose that word because of its meaning to turn in the other direction. I believe the Bible when it says that it is never too late to change course.

Christian readers who voted for Trump may feel that I came down hard on them but let Clinton voters off easy. I did not, after all, call Clinton voters to repent even though they voted for (and thus endorsed) a candidate with abortion views more extreme than most of the country’s.

I think that is a fair criticism.   Continue reading “If I could have a word with my Christian friends”

It’s not too late to do what’s right

I tried to vote for Hillary Clinton. I really did. As Election Day drew near, though, I realized that a vote for Clinton would be interpreted as an endorsement. It did not matter that my vote for her was meant simply as a vote against Trump, it would not be catalogued that way.

And so, in the end, I voted for independent Evan McMullin. I understood that I was voting for someone who could not possibly win, but I also understood that votes are interpreted as endorsements, and we need to be very careful with them.

I wish my friends who voted for Trump had been more careful. I understand that many of them intended their votes simply to be votes against Clinton. Perhaps they couldn’t abide her extreme abortion views. Maybe they were tired of progressives’ condescending finger-wagging. They may believe the Obama economic policies have failed to serve the country, and they are fearful of insurance premiums rising even higher.

All of these are reasonable objections in my view. Unfortunately, in the service of these beliefs, my friends also endorsed dangerous and racist views. The intent of their votes does nothing to mitigate their impact. Continue reading “It’s not too late to do what’s right”

What a vote for Trump says to Black Americans

UPDATE: I did not end up voting for Hillary Clinton. My concerns were too grave.

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I want to address my white, conservative readers, the ones considering voting for Donald Trump next month.

I myself am a conservative in many matters. And, I, too, believe Hillary Clinton has a long history of dishonesty*. The peril she chose to put our country in by using a private email server during her time as Secretary of State astounds me. I do not believe one word she has said on this subject or on many others.

I am, however, planning to vote for her. Continue reading “What a vote for Trump says to Black Americans”

On Brock Turner, consequences, and purple crayons

Once a month, I meet with an ecumenical group of moms from our elementary school to pray. We pray for the district, the school, the staff, and our kids. We pray for everything we can think of. I always pray that if my kids do something bad that they will get caught. 

This may seem counter-intuitive. Why would I want to get a call from the school that my child has misbehaved? Wouldn’t it be easier if they just got away with it? Continue reading “On Brock Turner, consequences, and purple crayons”

On Justice and Lament

In my early twenties, I had a room-mate who was a PhD student in Space Science. Kandis-Lea was an unexpected mix of folksy and scholarly. She would return from her lab late at night and unwind by watching Touched by an Angel; when I rolled my eyes, she would just giggle. Her research was on the moon of Jupiter called Io, and though I attended her dissertation defense, I could not have told you one thing about it, even an hour later. It all flew straight over my head. To this day, Kandis-Lea closes all her emails to me with “Love you dearly.” We have not lived together since 2001, but she is one my most loyal friends. Should I ever be in grave danger, I am confident the Holy Spirit would alert her and she would throw herself into praying for me. Continue reading “On Justice and Lament”